Monday June 5th
May 23, 2017
Saturday June 3rd
May 23, 2017
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Sunday June 4th

Go-go Brunch Feat. Be’la Dona

Date: June 4, 2017

Time: 1:30pm

 

Address:
620 T Street, NW
Washington, DC 20001

Cost: From $20.00 to $20.00

Buy tickets for this event

DC Jazz Preview Festival – Jazz ‘N Families Fun Days

Date: June 4, 2017

Time: 12:00pm to 7:00pm

 

Address:
1600 21st Street, NW
Washington, DC 20009

From: DC Jazz Festival

A fun family weekend with live jazz music featuring the finest talent in the region including vibrant galleries, art-making activities, an instrument petting zoo, interactive storytelling, a free film screening and much more! Featuring Janell Gill, David Schulman + Quiet Life Motel, Donato Soviero Trio, Donvonte McCoy Quartet, and John Lee Trio. Free entry

Girls On The Run – DC Spring 2017 5K

Date: June 4, 2017

Time: 8:00am

 

Address:
1455 Pennsylvania Avenue NorthWest
Washington, DC 20004

Join Girls on the Run – DC and more than 1,000 girls as we run or walk a 5K through the heart of the city to celebrate being joyful, healthy, and confident.

KIDS’ DASH (3-10 YEAR OLD NON-GOTR PARTICIPANTS)

SET AND ACHIEVE YOUR PERSONAL GOAL WITH OUR NEW TIMING SYSTEM!

RECEIVE RACE SHIRT PREMIUM (GUARANTEED SIZE IF REGISTERED BY MAY 1ST)

PURCHASE GOTR SWAG AT OUR MERCHANDISE TENT!

Exhibition – Senses Of Time Video And Film-based Works Of Africa

Date:June 3, 2017

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

Address:
950 Independence Avenue, South West
Washington, DC 20560

Cost: Free

From: Smithsonian National Museum of African Art

Our hearts beat to the rhythms of biological time and continents drift in geological time, while we set our watches to the precision of naval time. Time may seem easy to measure, but it can be challenging to understand. The six African artists featured in Senses of Time explore how time is experienced—and produced—by the body. Bodies stand, climb, dance, and dissolve in seven works of video and film—or “time-based”—art. Characters and the actions they depict repeat, resist, and reverse the expectation that time must move relentlessly forward.
Senses of Time invites viewers to consider tensions between personal and political time, ritual and technological time, bodily and mechanical time. Through pacing, sequencing, looping, layering, and mirroring, diverse perceptions of time are embodied and expressed.
History repeats itself as Yinka Shonibare MBE’s European ballroom dancers in sumptuous African-print fabric gowns dramatize the absurdities of political violence, while Sammy Baloji choreographs a haunting exploration of memory and forgetting in the ruins of postcolonial deindustrialization. Sue Williamson sensitively highlights the generational gaps wrought by time, while Berni Searle addresses genealogical time in one work as ancestral family portraits are tossed by the winds and focuses on the slippages and fragility of time and personal identity in another. Moataz Nasr’s work treads upon identities distorted by the march of time as Theo Eshetu draws us into a captivating kaleidoscopic space where past, present, and future converge.

Exhibition – Smithsonian Gardens Presents Orchids: A Moment

 
Website: Click to visit the siteDate:
June 3, 2017

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

 

Address:
700 Independence Avenue South West
Washington, DC 20013

Cost: Free

From: Hirshhorn Museum And Sculpture Garden

Orchids: A Moment, the 22nd annual orchid exhibition presented by Smithsonian Gardens and the United States Botanic Garden, showcases hundreds of fragrant orchids against the backdrop of the Hirshhorn’s unique architecture. Selected from the collections of both Smithsonian Gardens and the United States Botanic Garden, the flowers are presented as objects of art and beauty in a colorful installation that features time-lapse videos of orchids stretching into full blossom. Visitors are encouraged to enjoy the exotic assemblage as a whole as well as each orchid as it stands in that moment.
Date: January 14 through May 14th, 2017

Exhibition – Trolley Car Mail

 
Website: Click to visit the siteDate:
June 3, 2017

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

 

Address:
2 Massachusetts Avenue,North East
Washington, DC 20002

Cost: Free

From: National Postal Museum

In 1892 St. Louis, Missouri added specially-outfitted cars to their mail vehicles. The service sped up mail deliveries, making it especially popular with businesses. Twelve other cities across the country jumped on board. By 1908 there were mail trolleys in Brooklyn, Boston, Chicago, Cincinnati, New York, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., San Francisco, Rochester, Pittsburg, Seattle and Cleveland. Electrically-powered trolleys offered the opportunity for clerks to use electrically-powered canceling machines on board. What was fast became even faster. Between trolleys and multiple daily deliveries in large cities, individuals or businesses could send and receive letters as many as three to four times a day! That may not sound like much in our age of texting, but it was extraordinary to individuals at the turn of the last century. Mail trolleys were a great success, but everything has its day. In 1913 Parcel Post Service began and instead of sacks of letters, clerks had sacks and sacks of packages to process. Far more in weight and volume than they could handle in the relatively tiny cars. About the same time the Post Office had begun using trucks to carry mail. Most cities stopped using mail trolleys between 1913 and 1919. Baltimore’s trolleys kept going until 1929, but after that, mail trolleys were no more.

Date:April 14 – July 10th, 2017

Takoma Park Farmers Market

Date:June 3, 2017

Time: 10:00am to 2:00pm

Address:
Laurel Avenue
Takoma Park, MD 20912

From: Takoma Park Farmers Market

Palisades Farmers Market

Date: June 3, 2017

Time: 9:00am to 1:00pm

Address:
48th Place NorthWest at MacArthur Boulevard
Washington, DC 20007

From: Palisades Farmers Market

Exhibition – Linn Meyers: Our View From Here

Date: June 3, 2017

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

 

Address:
700 Independence Avenue South West
Washington, DC 20013

Cost: Free

From: Hirshhorn Museum And Sculpture Garden

Linn Meyers (American, b. Washington, D.C., 1968; lives and works in Washington, D.C.) will create her largest work, “Our View From Here,” at the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden this spring. The site-specific wall drawing, which stretches the entire circumference of the inner-circle galleries on the museum’s second level, more than 400 linear feet, will be on view May 12, 2016–May 14, 2017. The drawing is temporary and will be painted over at the end of the exhibition’s yearlong run. Meyers will discuss her work in a Meet the Artist talk Wednesday, May 25, 2016, at 6:30 p.m.
“We are rethinking the ways our spaces can be used, throughout the museum,” said Melissa Chiu, the Hirshhorn’s director. “And we will be taking full advantage of the inner-circle galleries as venues for site-specific 360-degree artworks. Linn Meyers’ project will be the first in a series of exhibitions by some of the most exciting artists working today.”
“The Hirshhorn’s unique architecture presents opportunities that simply don’t exist elsewhere,” said Stéphane Aquin, the museum’s chief curator and the curator of the exhibition. “Meyers’ process involves both planning and accident. The interaction between her fluid lines and the building’s rigorous geometries will produce stunning effects.”
Meyers creates her works by hand-drawing thousands of closely spaced, rippling lines, each nested beside the one that came before it. Drawing alone for long hours each day with a type of marker often used by graffiti writers, she welcomes the imperfections that are a natural part of working without templates or taped lines. The resulting patterns flow and pulse with energy.
Meyers has had solo exhibitions at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., and the American University Museum at the Katzen Center in Washington, D.C., among other venues. She has participated in group exhibitions at institutions including the Hirshhorn, the Phillips Collection, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Corcoran Gallery of Art and the National Museum of Women in the Arts, all in Washington, D.C., the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Mattress Factory in Pittsburgh. Her work is in numerous public and private collections, including the Hirshhorn, the Phillips Collection and the Smithsonian American Art Museum. She received a Master of Fine Arts from the California College of the Arts and a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the Cooper Union.
Date: May 12th, 2016 through August 20th, 2017

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